Cloud Nightlight Color-Changing LED conversion

Big Clive recently reviewed a cheap cloud-shaped nightlight from China, and later recorded a video showing how to convert it to use color-changing RGB LEDs:

I wanted to build one myself, and already had the LEDs, so I ordered a cloud nightlight from China. It was a little less than $2.00 USD shipped and arrived approximately 5 weeks later. Right away I had problems with it as it was damaged; the plug and circuit board were both loose. I was worried the screw that holds the plug might be stripped, but fortunately it was not and I was able to repair it. With everything in place, I tried it out, and it looks very nice:

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Reload Controller header image

Reload Controller

Earlier this year I purchased an Arachnid Labs Re:load Pro, which is an adjustable constant-current load. I’ve always wanted an electronic load for my lab, but didn’t want the spend the money. The Re:load Pro solved that problem as it’s just $125. Sure, it doesn’t sink as much current or have all the options of fancier units, but it does everything I need. For testing panel meters, batteries and LEDs, it’s quite capable. So far, I’m happy.

Reload Controller Main screenOne of the features that caught my interest when I purchased it was the ability to interact with it via a virtual serial port on the USB interface. I immediately got the idea to develop an application that could control a Re:load Pro, but didn’t have time to work on it. Recently however, I started working on serial port projects at work again, and I finally completed my serial port class, called dsub. I needed to test it, and I thought of the Re:load Pro. It was a perfect device for testing. I set about developing an app, and correcting some bugs in dsub along the way. The result is an improved dsub class, and a small application called Reload Controller which I’m releasing here. Read More

Update: Memory usage reporting fixed in Analog PC Stats application

I no longer maintain this project here, please visit the new website for it to download the updated software:

http://swvincent.com/pcmeter/index.html

Thanks! -Scott.


Updated PC Meter application

It was brought to my attention a couple months ago by mnedix that the application I developed for the Analog PC Stats Meter was not reporting the correction Memory usage. I looked into it, and it turns out that the PerformanceCounter I was using in C# ties into the page file, not just physical memory. Apparently it was close enough to the physical memory used when I tested the program initially, because I never caught it. I just released an updated version of the application today that get the actual physical memory percentage used (you can download it here). It utilizes the GetPerformanceInfo Windows API to do this, using code developed by Antonio Bakula. This post at Stack Overflow is what led me to his solution. As the screenshot above shows, it’s now very close to what Windows reports. It’s a little off, maybe due to rounding, I didn’t have a lot of time to dig deeper. It’s close enough, at least for me! In the screenshot, I’ve got a couple textboxes that display physical available memory and total physical memory for troubleshooting.

While I’m posting, I want to point out it’s been approximately a year since I last posted on my blog, but I’m still here. The last year-and-a-half has been quite hectic for me, but I hope to get back into working on projects and sharing them on here soon! I’ve heard from a few people who have enjoyed my posts and used the information I’ve shared to work on their own projects and it’s been great hearing from them. Thanks!

Crate built from upcycled pallet wood

Crate built from reclaimed pallet woodI recently inherited several tools and and pieces of equipment which I hope to put to good use someday. For now though, I live in an apartment, which means much of this stuff is going into storage. Some of the equipment is heavy and prone to damage, so I need a way to protect it. I decided to to build some small crates for these items, since cardboard boxes won’t be strong enough. However, I don’t want to spend a lot of money doing it, and lumber is expensive, so I figured I’d get what I need from old pallets. They’re a popular source of upcycled wood for DIY projects, which means there’s lots of info on how to reuse them, and best of all, they’re free. Last weekend I set about transforming some old pallets into crates and I’m quite happy with the results.

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Infrared Pulse Sensor

IR pulse sensor and oscilloscopeLast week, I bought something I’ve wanted for quite some time: an oscilloscope. I’ve been doing more projects where a scope would be useful, such as audio amplifiers, PWM, and AC-DC rectification. And besides that, oscilloscopes are just plain cool. Of course, a scope by itself isn’t much fun, it needs something to measure. Something like an AC sine-wave, or an audio signal, or maybe… a person’s pulse rate? It’s possible, with the right sensor. Sean Michael Regan shows us how in the latest MAKE Weekend Project. I knew right away that it was perfect for trying out my scope. It was a bit of work, primarily because I modified the circuit, but the finished sensor is a lot of fun, and there is a lot of potential for doing more with it.

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