LED Test Box from China

LED Test boxThis little LED test box couldn’t be simpler – pop an LED into the tester, push the button, and see it light up. The top header accommodates standard LEDs with two leads, and the bottom headers accommodate 4-pin “piranha” LEDs. I use it frequently when assembling LED lighting projects or to quickly test a new batch of LEDs. It’s a great value for the approximately $2.00 USD that I paid for it. With that said it has some issues, and there are a few things to be aware of when using these testers.

Build Quality

You can’t expect much for $2, but the quality is fine for the price. The biggest issue I have is the headers; they don’t always make good contact with the leads on the LEDs, especially the bottom rows for piranha LEDs. So sometimes I have to fiddle around with the LEDs to get solid contact. The other minor issue is the battery compartment, it’s fairly tight and I’ve had some trouble figuring out how to best orient the battery so it will fit with the case closed. With a little trial and error though, it’s possible.

These are minor quibbles, and acceptable given the price. But there are some more concerning issues with the circuit itself, which I’ll cover in the next couple sections.

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Reload Controller header image

Reload Controller

Earlier this year I purchased an Arachnid Labs Re:load Pro, which is an adjustable constant-current load. I’ve always wanted an electronic load for my lab, but didn’t want the spend the money. The Re:load Pro solved that problem as it’s just $125. Sure, it doesn’t sink as much current or have all the options of fancier units, but it does everything I need. For testing panel meters, batteries and LEDs, it’s quite capable. So far, I’m happy.

Reload Controller Main screenOne of the features that caught my interest when I purchased it was the ability to interact with it via a virtual serial port on the USB interface. I immediately got the idea to develop an application that could control a Re:load Pro, but didn’t have time to work on it. Recently however, I started working on serial port projects at work again, and I finally completed my serial port class, called dsub. I needed to test it, and I thought of the Re:load Pro. It was a perfect device for testing. I set about developing an app, and correcting some bugs in dsub along the way. The result is an improved dsub class, and a small application called Reload Controller which I’m releasing here. (more…)